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Overview

This Technical Analysis: Trading Strategies by Technical Analysis course covers the below-mentioned topics

More than 45 trading strategies shown to generate profit for Intraday traders and resolve all issues while doing trading

DAU Theory

Candlesticks and application in trading

Technical Indicators and their application

Stocks selection criteria

Trading Psychology and qualities of good trader

Entry and Exit points criteria in Trading

Trading with Indicators (SMA, MACD, ADX, Super trend, CCI, etc.)

Price action Trading without indicators (15 minutes candles breakout, Previous day open low high breakout strategies, and more...)

Different Trading strategies with patterns, technical Indicators

Support and resistance, practical use in trading

Fibonacci Retracement and its Trading application

Pivot points

Special pattern (Tweezers, Railway, Rectangle & Checkmate)

Trend lines

Future Vs options

Gap Theory, Island reversal and trading process for a trader to be profitable

Harmonic pattern (BAT, Shark, Crab and ABCD pattern, etc.)

Pattern description (Head and shoulder, Double bottom and top, Wedge, Channel trading, Triangle, Pendant, Saucer, etc.)

Nifty and Bank nifty future trading

Option chain and process to implement in swing Trading

PCR (Put call ratio) and application to use by swing or f&o trader

VIX, Its relationship with another index, Beta, and it application for Trader

Prediction of upcoming Trend using call and put

Day Trading Tips for Intraday Trader and his basic requirements for Trades as Trader

Major Trading Strategies: 

1. ADX Trading

2. Winning Trade technique (Using Awesome Oscillator, Parabolic SAR)

3. Trading Using VWAP

4.  Trading using (Head and shoulder, Double bottom and top, Wedge, Channel trading, Triangle, Penant, Saucer, etc.)

5. Trading with harmonic pattern (Crab, Shark, ABCD, etc.)

6. Double super trend (7,4), (7,3), RSI and Parabolic SAR strategy

7. 50 days EMA, MACD, and MFI Strategy

8. 20, 40 SMA and parabolic SAR strategy

9. Trading using Fibonacci and trend line

10. Bollinger band and RSI trading strategy

11. Trading using double bottom & double top pattern

12.  Trading using head and shoulders pattern

13. Trading using channel and triangle pattern

14. Trading using Cup with handle pattern

15. Elliot wave concept and trading strategies with different waves 

16. Fibonacci Fan and Fibonacci Arc Trading strategy

What Is Technical Analysis?

Technical analysis is a study that looks at past market data to create predictions about future performance in the finance business. These technical indicators are used by technical analysts to interpret price movements, predict time frames, and make sense of market volatility.

Technical Analysis: An Overview

Technical analysis, as opposed to fundamental analysis, focuses on the examination of price and volume. Fundamental analysis aims to estimate a security's worth based on business performance such as sales and earnings. Technical analysis methods are used to examine how variations in price, volume, and implied volatility are affected by supply and demand for securities.

Technical analysis is frequently used to produce short-term trading signals using various charting tools, but it may also be used to improve the assessment of a security's strength or weakness about the larger market or one of its sectors. This data aids analysts in bettering their overall valuation estimate.

Any security with past trading data can benefit from technical analysis. Stocks, futures, commodities, fixed-income, currencies, and other securities fall under this category. We'll use stocks as examples in this course, but keep in mind that these concepts can be applied to any sort of security. Technical analysis is far more common in commodities and FX markets, where traders are more concerned with short-term price swings.

In the late 1800s, Charles Dow and the Dow Theory established technical analysis as we know it today. 1 William P. Hamilton, Robert Rhea, Edson Gould, and John Magee were among the notable researchers who contributed to Dow Theory concepts and helped to create its foundation. Nowadays, technical analysis includes hundreds of patterns and signals that have been established over many years of research.

When used in conjunction with proper investing or trading principles, technical analysis assumes that a security's historical trading activity and price fluctuations can be useful indicators of the security's future price movements. Technical analysis is frequently combined with other types of study by professional analysts. Retail traders may make choices entirely based on a security's price charts and other statistics, but practicing stock analysts rarely do so.

Among professional analysts, the CMT Association represents the world's largest group of chartered or certified analysts who use technical analysis in their work. After passing three rounds of exams that encompass both a broad and detailed look at technical analysis tools, the organization was awarded the Chartered Market Technician (CMT) certification. For people who hold a Certified Financial Analyst (CFA) charter, the association has waived Level 1 of the CMT test. This exemplifies how nicely the two disciplines complement one another.

Technical analysis aims to predict the price movement of nearly any tradable instrument subject to supply and demand pressures, such as stocks, bonds, futures, and currency pairs. Some people consider technical analysis to be nothing more than the study of supply and demand forces as represented in a security's market price movements. Although price fluctuations are the most typical focus of technical analysis, some analysts also examine other metrics, such as trade volume or open interest.

Hundreds of patterns and signals have been generated by researchers to enhance technical analysis trading across the sector. To foresee and trade market fluctuations, technical analysts have devised a variety of trading strategies. Some indicators are primarily concerned with identifying the current market trend, such as support and resistance levels, while others are concerned with determining the trend's strength and its chances of continuation. Trendlines, channels, moving averages, and momentum indicators are some of the most commonly utilized technical indicators and chart patterns.

Technical analysts consider the following main sorts of indications in general:

• Trends in prices

• Patterns on the graph

• Indicators of volume and momentum

• Oscillators

• Moving averages are a type of average that is used to

• Levels of support and resistance

Technical Analysis' Underlying Assumptions

Fundamental analysis and technical analysis are the two main methodologies for analyzing stocks and making investment decisions. The technical analysis considers that a security's price already reflects all publicly accessible information and instead focuses on a statistical study of price movements, whereas fundamental analysis examines a company's financial documents to establish the fair worth of the business. Rather than studying a security's intrinsic features, the technical analysis aims to understand the market sentiment underlying price fluctuations by looking for patterns and trends.

Charles Dow published a series of editorials delving into the theory of technical analysis. Two essential assumptions in his articles have since been the underpinning for technical analysis trading.

Markets are efficient when values indicate elements that affect the price of an asset, yet

Even seemingly random market price fluctuations appear to follow discernible patterns and trends that tend to repeat themselves over time.



Technical Analysis vs. Fundamental Analysis

The two major schools of thinking when it comes to approaching the markets, fundamental analysis, and technical analysis, are on different ends of the spectrum. Both strategies are used to analyze and estimate future stock price patterns, and they, like every investment strategy or philosophy, have supporters and detractors.

Fundamental analysis is a method of appraising securities that aim to determine a stock's inherent worth. Fundamental analysts look at everything from the overall economy and industry conditions to a company's financial situation and management. Fundamental analysts pay close attention to earnings, expenses, assets, and liabilities.

What Are Technical Analysts' Assumptions?

Professional technical analysts usually accept three basic assumptions about the field. The first is that the market discounts everything, comparable to the efficient market hypothesis. Second, regardless of the time frame being analyzed, they expect prices to reveal trends, even in random market moves. Finally, they believe that events tend to repeat themselves. Market psychology, which tends to be fairly predictable based on emotions like fear or excitement, is sometimes blamed for the repeated nature of price fluctuations.

What Is the Difference Between Technical and Fundamental Analysis?

The two major schools of thinking when it comes to approaching the markets, fundamental analysis, and technical analysis, are on different ends of the spectrum. Fundamental analysis is a method of appraising securities that aim to determine a stock's inherent worth.

Technical analysis, on the other hand, is based on the notion that all known fundamentals are integrated into pricing, so there is no need to pay attention to them. Instead of attempting to determine a security's intrinsic value, technical analysts analyze stock charts to uncover patterns and trends that may indicate what the security will do in the future.

What Is Technical Analysis and How Is It Used?

Technical analysis aims to predict the price movement of nearly any tradable instrument subject to supply and demand pressures, such as stocks, bonds, futures, and currency pairs. Hundreds of patterns and signals have been generated by researchers to enhance technical analysis trading across the sector. To foresee and trade market fluctuations, technical analysts have devised a variety of trading strategies.

There are a lot more strategies for traders which will suit and make them profitable.

  • This course will help traders basic problems and make him profitable in intraday and swing trading..

  • Trader should be minimum Intermediate level education (12th Pass and willing to learn financial Market)


About the instructor


                                 Satyendra singh

Satyendra singh

More than 22 years of experience in industry and working in stock market as independent Investment Consultant, Trainer and Trader

NCFM Certification:

Technical Analysis Module

Fundamental Analysis Module

Options Strategies Module

Investment analysis and Portfolio Management

 

NSIM Certification:

NSE Certified Research Analyst    

Achievement in financial Market

NSE Academy Certified Market professional (NCMP)- Level 1 Award

October 2019

I give coaching in following area and doing consultancy in financial market.

1. Technical Analysis

2. Fundamental Analysis

3. Options Strategies

4. Research Analysis

5. Intra Day and Swing Trading

6. Nifty and Bank Nifty Trading

7. Future Trading

8. Portfolio Management

 

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Technical Analysis: Trading Strategies by Technical Analysis

    Course Features

  • Lectures 37
  • Duration 11 Hours
  • Skill level All level
  • Language English